Posted in tools

How does the Internet work? #Balsamiq

hope-you-have-an1

Two at once blog post.

#1 Balsamiq

Balsamiq is an amazing tool for UI prototyping. Any of you could take advantage of it. It helps not only in UI prototyping, but also may be used in any sort of your visual communication with customers, stakeholders or developers. It is simple, free to try for 30 days and easy to use. Balsamiq provides various options for web and mobile prototyping.

What I wanted to visualize today is an interesting question:

#2 How does the internet work

Let me rephrase that question: what happens when you type http://www.something.com into your web browser. My Balsamiq-made info graphics – hopefully – would be an answer.

client-server

What the browser is going to do?

Step 1:

It will try to translate your URL into IP address. In order to do that – the browser checks cache (a place where system saves last translation results). If the cache is empty – browser will send a request to DNS server. The DNS server provides the browser with URL translated into IP address. Finally our browser would know the address (a default HTTP port = 80) which is responsible for GET our request.

Step 2:

Server transforms the request and if everything is OK response with the HTML website and at the same time 200 OK status.

Generally, in order to understand how does the internet work, we would have to know the answer to a question – what the HTTP protocol is.

HTTP stands for “Hypertext Transfer Protocol”. The entire World Wide Web uses this protocol. Almost everything you see in your browser is transmitted to your computer over HTTP. For example, when you opened this article page, your browser probably have sent over 40 HTTP requests and received HTTP responses for each.

HTTP headers are the core part of these HTTP requests and responses, and they carry information about the client browser, the requested page, the server and more.

To make my above graphics simpler – we could present it this way – using Balsamiq again:

http

Hope my short post encouraged you to try Balsamiq and use it within your testing tasks.
In case of any comments –  stalk me on Twitter 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s